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Context-Based Wireless Link Prediction for Drone Communications

Start: 10/24/2018 at 3:30PM
End: 10/24/2018 at 4:30PM
Location: 317 DeBartolo Hall
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Drone communications inherently carries a challenge of needing to communicate in three dimensions at any point in time. This is a challenge due to UAV space, power, and load restrictions and an inability to communicate on the opposite side of the drone in some cases due to rigid drone bodies and non-optimal antenna orientations. Fortunately, UAVs have a number of sensors such as Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs), 4K cameras, and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) that could potential infer environmental context to improve drone-to-drone and drone-to-ground wireless links. In this talk, we leverage cellular crowdsourcing, sensed geographical features, and environmental contexts to enable robust wireless links for efficient coordination among drone swarms.

 

 

 

Dr. Joseph Camp

Associate Professor

Southern Methodist University

 

 

Joseph Camp is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Engineering at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. He joined the SMU faculty in 2009 after receiving his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Rice University. He received an M.S. at Rice and B.S. with honors from the University of Texas at Austin, both in ECE. His research interests are in the areas of drone communications, crowdsourcing, and data analytics, specifically focused on the deployment, measurement, and analysis of large-scale wireless networks and development of embedded protocols for network hardware. His research team has performed over 200 million in-field wireless measurements around the world via Android deployment and local characterization via campus buses, vehicles, and buildings. He was the Chief Network Architect for the Technology For All (TFA) Network, a mesh deployment in Houston, TX which serves 4,000 users in an under-resourced community. He received the Ralph Budd Award for the best engineering thesis at Rice University (2010), the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (2012), and the Golden Mustang Teaching Award (2014).