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Low Complexity, Low Cost, Low Power RF

One of the key challenges of millimeter wave systems is the increased path loss at high frequencies compared with current sub-6 GHz wireless networks. A proposed solution is to employ high-gain antenna arrays which compensate for the path loss but have a corresponding narrow beamwidth. In order to maintain a wireless link with a mobile device, beam-steering is employed. Traditional beam-steering uses active phased arrays which incur a high cost and power dissipation. An alternative to active phased array beam steering antennas is the passive Luneberg lens which boasts zero power dissipation, low-loss, and high gain. However, the Luneberg lens is a 3D (spherical) gradient index lens traditionally requiring elaborate machining of concentric shells of dielectric. Due to the difficulties of fabrication this lens has traditionally only been realized in bands below 20 GHz.

Recently, the method of transformation optics has been presented as a means of physically distorting an electromagnetic structure and maintaining its functionality by spatially varying the permittivity throughout the structure. This has enabled the design of flat lenses but they require so-called gradient index optics. Over the past year, we have developed a process for manufacturing gradient index optics targeting the millimeter wave bands from 30-150 GHz. The approach is known as perforated media.